ECSAS 2023 – Turin 26-29 July

40 – De-Globalization in South Asia – Global flows, politics of restricting goods and media, and the revival of populisms and post-colonial cultural markers

As a consequence of the war in the Ukraine and the Covid pandemic, the interruption of global flows is at centre stage. After decades of globalization in South Asia, processes of deglobalization have been witnessed in the fields of trade, media and identity politics in South Asian regions.

Convenors

Schleiter Markus - Department of Social & Cultural Anthropology, Münster University, Münster, Germany
Brandt Carmen - Department of South Asian Studies, Bonn University, Bonn, Germany

Long Abstract

As a consequence of the war in the Ukraine and the Covid pandemic, the interruption of global flows is at centre stage. After decades of globalization in South Asia, processes of deglobalization have been witnessed in the fields of trade, media and identity politics in South Asian regions. For instance, the Indian state has cut the flows of goods as well as digital media by restricting the export of Covid vaccines or wheat and prohibiting apps from China. On a more regional level: leaders of social movements set up street blockades to hinder the transport of goods as part of local power struggles. In the field of identity politics, the revival of populist discourses (Udupa 2017) as well as post-/colonial cultural markers serve as counter movements to the supposed uniformity of global cosmopolitanism.

This panel seeks to go beyond an understanding of de-/globalization as a dichotomic counter-moment to global flows. We will rather reflect on processes of de-/globalization as an inherent part of global flows (see Middleton et al. 2020). For example, does digital activism of social movements (as of Dalit movements) refer to global circulating discourses? Does it branch out to global networks? In which way then global outreach is part of restrictions of communities? What role do specific cultural concepts in South Asia, e.g. ideas of leadership and patronage, play? How do such concepts connect to de-/globalization?

We invite scholars from various disciplines to discuss and share their theoretical knowledge or empirical research findings. We welcome research tying analysis from computer science and economics with sociocultural or linguistic approaches.